JSF & Java Blog

Discussion on Java and JSF, including Spring, Maven, Eclipse and Jenkins

Resources

Listed below are some useful links to Java and JSF related resources.

JavaServer Faces

JavaServer Faces – JavaServer Faces is a Java based web application framework intended to simplify development integration of web-based user interfaces.

PrimeFaces – PrimeFaces is an open source component suite for Java Server Faces featuring 70+ Ajax powered rich set of JSF components.

RichFaces – RichFaces is a component library for JSF and an advanced framework for easily integrating AJAX capabilities into business applications.

Frameworks

Spring – Spring provides an incredibly powerful and flexible collection of technologies to improve your enterprise Java application development that is used by millions of developers.

Struts – The Apache Struts web framework is a free open-source solution for creating Java web applications. The framework’s architecture and tags are buzzword compliant. Struts works well with conventional REST applications and with nouveau technologies like SOAP and AJAX.

Unit Testing

PowerMock – PowerMock is a framework that extend other mock libraries such as EasyMock with more powerful capabilities. PowerMock uses a custom classloader and bytecode manipulation to enable mocking of static methods, constructors, final classes and methods, private methods, removal of static initializers and more.

EasyMock – EasyMock provides Mock Objects for interfaces (and objects through the class extension) by generating them on the fly using Java’s proxy mechanism.

JUnit – JUnit is a simple framework for writing and running automated tests.

Build Tools

Maven – Apache Maven is a software project management and comprehension tool. Based on the concept of a project object model (POM), Maven can manage a project’s build, reporting and documentation from a central piece of information.

Jenkins – Jenkins is an award-winning application that monitors executions of repeated jobs, such as building a software project or jobs run by cron. Among those things, current Jenkins focuses on the following two jobs:

  1. Building/testing software projects continuously, just like CruiseControl or DamageControl. In a nutshell, Jenkins provides an easy-to-use so-called continuous integration system, making it easier for developers to integrate changes to the project, and making it easier for users to obtain a fresh build. The automated, continuous build increases the productivity.
  2. Monitoring executions of externally-run jobs, such as cron jobs and procmail jobs, even those that are run on a remote machine. For example, with cron, all you receive is regular e-mails that capture the output, and it is up to you to look at them diligently and notice when it broke. Jenkins keeps those outputs and makes it easy for you to notice when something is wrong.

Integrated Development Environments

Eclipse – Tools for Java developers creating Java EE and Web applications, including a Java IDE, tools for Java EE, JPA, JSF, Mylyn and others.

NetBeans – The NetBeans project consists of an open-source IDE and an application platform that enable developers to rapidly create web, enterprise, desktop, and mobile applications using the Java platform, as well as JavaFX, PHP, JavaScript and Ajax, Ruby and Ruby on Rails, Groovy and Grails, and C/C++.